The Integrity Roundtables 2016

Monday 24 October, Legislative Council Chamber, Queensland Parliament

 

roundtables

Integrity 20 is hosting a series of small group, ‘integrity roundtable’ meetings to discuss some core ethics and integrity questions generated by the agenda this and previous Integrity 20 conferences. These roundtables will bring together some of the main speakers from the Integrity 20’16 conference, local experts and interested groups in a less structured atmosphere.

We invite people working in relevant areas of business, academia, government and other areas to register their interest to attend and participate in these meetings. As seating is strictly limited, places will be awarded based on relevance of the agenda to professional work and interests.

The Integrity Roundtables

MON 24 OCT

8.30 AM

Welcome

Charles Sampford
Co-Convenor, Integrity 20 and Director of the Institute of Ethics, Governance and Law (IEGL), Griffith University

8.40 AM
ROUNDTABLE 1

Business and license to operate

The ‘social license to operate’ acknowledges that a corporation can only exist within a community, and gain access to its consumer-base, if it is legally recognised by that community. Corporations also enjoy special privileges, such as limited liability. Communities do not provide such benefits for the good of corporations. They do it for the benefit flowing from them. The social license to operate asserts that corporations need to justify themselves to the communities in which they operate on the basis of the benefits they deliver – and commit themselves to delivering those benefits rather than paying lip service to the ideal.

Discussion Leaders:
Mr Rafael Marques de Morais, Anti-corruption campaigner, investigative journalist
Mr Victor Perton, Advocate & Adviser – Leadership, Governance, Engagement & Events
Mr James S Henry, Investigative journalist, economist and attorney
Mr Michael Croker, Tax Policy Expert, Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand
Ms Teresa Dyson, Chair Business Law Section of the Law Council of Australia, Consultant McCullough Robertson
Dr Hugh Breakey, President Australian Association for Professional and Applied Ethics

Key questions:

  • Do businesses have a social licence to operate?
    o What are the terms?
    o To whom are the duties owed?
    o When should the social license to operate be revoked?
  • Is paying tax part of CSR/social license to operate?
    o How can companies who pay their tax deal with competitors who do not?
  • Recognizing the special benefits provided by state to banks (such as being the lender of last resort), what key roles do banks have to play to justify those benefits?

10.40 AM

Morning tea

11.05 PM
ROUNDTABLE 2

Integrity in International Agreements

Political decisions involve norms, facts and predictions. These emerge from an array of different sources, each with their own capabilities and advantages – and each with their own problems and vulnerabilities. The sources include: standing commissions; royal commissions; political debate; lobbying; mainstream media; government-owned media; social media; political advertising; NGOs and think tanks; corporations and unions.

Discussion Leaders:
Ms Anna Neistat, Human rights activist, lawyer and conflict zone specialist
Dr Ma Thida, Surgeon, writer, public intellectual and former ‘prisoner of conscience’
Emeritus Prof Robert Manne, Historian, public intellectual & commentator, author
Mr David Costello, Secretary AIIA Qld and former foreign editor of the Courier Mail
Prof Charles Sampford, Director the Institute for Ethics, Governance and Law, Co-Convenor: Integrity 20

Key questions

  • What are each sources strengths and weaknesses? How do we enhance the former and limit the latter? How do we integrate these debates? Can improvements in one area generate improvements in others?
  • What are the ethical responsibilities of journalists and media organisations, and to whom are they owed?
  • To whom does press freedom belong – media owners, journalists or those who have a right to be informed?
  • How should we choose what royal commissions to hold, what terms they should be given, and who should be appointed?
  • How large a problem is the use of scare campaigns in political debate?

1.00 PM

Lunch

2.00 PM
ROUNDTABLE 3

Integrity in political debate – how should ‘we’ decide?

Political decisions involve norms, facts and predictions. These emerge from an array of different sources, each with their own capabilities and advantages – and each with their own problems and vulnerabilities. The sources include: standing commissions; royal commissions; political debate; lobbying; mainstream media; government-owned media; social media; political advertising; NGOs and think tanks; corporations and unions.

Prof Charles Lewis, Investigative journalist, best-selling author and founder of Public Integrity
Mr James S Henry, Investigative journalist, economist and attorney
Emeritus Prof Robert Manne, Historian, public intellectual & commentator, author
Emeritus Prof Raimond Gaita, Author, philosopher and public intellectual
Prof Janet Ransley, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice (CCJ) & Griffith Criminology Institute (GCI)
Ms Madonna King, Award-winning journalist, author and commentator

Key questions

  • What are each sources strengths and weaknesses? How do we enhance the former and limit the latter? How do we integrate these debates? Can improvements in one area generate improvements in others?
  • What are the ethical responsibilities of journalists and media organisations, and to whom are they owed?
  • To whom does press freedom belong – media owners, journalists or those who have a right to be informed?
  • How should we choose what royal commissions to hold, what terms they should be given, and who should be appointed
  • How large a problem is the use of scare campaigns in political debate?

4.00 PM

Afternoon tea

4.20 PM
ROUNDTABLE 4

What should the next two royal commissions be about?

The last parliament established two royal commissions, one into unions and the other into the ‘pink batts’ program. The current government has established a royal commission into NT juvenile detention. What other Royal Commissions should be considered for this parliament?

  1. Banks;
  2. Tax;
  3. Australian refugee policy;
  4. Decisions to go to war (an Australian ‘Chilcott’ Enquiry);
  5. Should Australia have an anti-corruption agency? If so, what should it cover?

One speaker argues for each alternative, leading to a brief discussion and a straw vote.

5.00 PM

Closing session

What are the issues we should consider for Integrity 20 in 2017?